Fun With Numbers: Directors With Blockbuster Chops (Part 2: 2 Shows)

Continued from part 1, here are the rest of the directors that managed to notch multiple credits on 10,000 plus per volume hits. 13 guys directed two non-sequel hits, which, adding in the 4 from before, gives a total of 17 people in the history of anime to make this particular list.

As before, note that while anidb and ann are being used, they are potentially incomplete sources. For example, Tsuda Naokatsu only receives Uta Kata production assistance credit on ann. I will generally give direction credit to anyone who is listed as a director on one of the two sites, and directed a plurality of the episodes. Series director vs. plain Director titles for shows that gave the two to different people were tricky to interpret – I opted to give the title to the staffer listed as just director.

An Important Note About The Classification: I only included non-sequel anime when looking for directors. This means nothing with some manifestation of a 2 in the title. Ditto for Gundam or Macross franchise entries after the original. My rationale is that it’s a lot harder to make a prime-time anime from scratch, even with popular source material, than it is to continue living in a house you or someone else built. I count A Certain Scientific Railgun and Mononoke as spinoffs rather than sequels, as the series they spun off of are considerably less well-established franchises.

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Via Newtype USA: Morio Asaka and Nanase Ohkawa on Chobits (March 2003)

This is a neat interview tidbit showing off some of the thought processes permeating earlier era Madhouse (the [inside] article on Madhouse, in another issue, elaborates a bit on their clamp connection). Morio Asaka talks about the blurred line between manga for girls and manga for boys (considering Chobits as a shojo manga even though it ran in a shonen magazine). Hidetoshi Abe mentions a post-credits revision to the second CCS movie’s ending that never made it in. Nanase Ohkawa talks about how she depicts male characters and the less intensive role (relative to CCS) she played in the anime’s production.

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