One Punch Man Sold 13,289 Copies in Week 1

One Punch Man sold 13,289 copies in week 1 (the week ending in April 30th, 2017), all of which were BD/DVD combos. It’s not a surprising figure, given the high level of popularity the series enjoys in the US. Source here, photo evidence after the jump.

Digimon tri’s release week data will be coming out soon. I’m waiting with baited breath, hoping for an appearance in the top 20. It’s going to be close, and depend heavily on thresholds.

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Naruto Shippuden Uncut Set 30 and Boruto Movie US Sales Figures

I went combing through the US BD/DVD charts for April, and I found a pair of interesting results. First, the Boruto movie sold 19,617 copies (10,421 DVDs, 9196 BDs) in its first week out. Second, the 30th DVD box set for Naruto Shippuden, which came out on April 4th, sold 11,532 copies in its first week, 30,900 copies over 3 weeks.

Note that the 30th box set is labelled as Naruto Shippuden the Movie, but no Shippuden movie was released in early April 2017, while the 30th box set was. This would not be the first or the tenth labeling error the Nash DB would have made with regards to anime.

Source pics after the jump.

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Fun With Numbers: Correlation Coefficients for Manga Sales Boosts and the Kickstarter Analogy

Let’s say, for the sake of argument, you’re a fan of Attack on Titan. You watched the entire show as it aired and can’t wait for more of it. What if, tomorrow, a Kickstarter went up for a 12-episode second season of the show. How much, without knowing the reward tiers, would you give? $1? $10? $20? $50? $100 (like the U.S. disks for season 1 as a whole will likely cost)?

I’d imagine that, depending on just how much they enjoyed AoT, most people would answer with a number within their price range. Given the popularity of the show, such a project would be a fairly safe bet to break the current record for animation projects on the site (currently Bee and Puppycat’s $872,133).

But let’s make a key change to this project. Let’s suppose that, instead of a give-what-you-can model of pricing, this hypothetical Kickstarter only allowed pledges at or above $500 level. Even for a series with a lot of enthusiastic fans, I’m willing to bet that turns some of them off. Even if that $500 level includes a meet-and-greet with the anime’s entire cast and signed copy of volume 1 of the manga, that’s just more than what many people are willing (or able) to pay. And that is the crux of the matter when it comes to discussing who buys anime.

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