Fun With Numbers: Amazon Rank Progression for US Releases (March 25)

Note: The part 3 of the series on composers is on hold for a little bit. I got pretty deep into the rabbit hole and want to actually listen to the stuff these guys wrote to see if their big pieces have common elements. Since music is more passive listening, it’s somewhat feasible, and is an important part of looking at what that junk stat means, if anything.

And speaking of articles delayed way longer than I expected them to be, game adaptations! While console game sales are somewhat reliably available via the numbers, PC VN data is not, so they can’t be reduced into a plottable stat in the same way that manga and LNs can (the latter’s data are still incomplete due to thresholds and long tails, but big gains are usually obvious because of there’s a baseline to compare them to). I eventually decided to start breaking them down as a two-number stat line; highest yearly rank on VN retailer getchu and console sales via vgchartz, both within one year on either side of the anime airdate. I hope that I’ll be able to start posting those 2011/2012 stat lines before Scottie Wilbekin wins me real money in my March Madness pool, both of which I have now successfully jinxed. Anyway.

This is the last individual/plot post I’ll be doing for the March US releases I’ve been tracking. The full sheet of data is available here. I’m doing tracking for several April releases as well, and will continue to do so so long as there look to be more questions worth the daily effort of collecting the figures. An analysis post, comparing some of the narratives I touched on earlier with the new data, discussing other points to attack with a sample that will continue to grow, and making very, very tentative factor-of-two sales estimates based on extrapolation from somewhat known low-end and high-end daily totals will (hopefully) be up sometime this week. Speaking of the low-end, here’s the last chart for the performance of that Aria the Natural release:

Aria-wk4Chart is date, rank, # in stock

Thankfully, I got the sale I needed this week. It seems like a single sale is enough to bump an item ranked 300,000th down under the 120,000th place no-sales line. Good to know.

Plots are posted after the jump.

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Fun With Numbers: Amazon Rank Progression for US Releases (March 4)

In the interest of not posting all the tank data in a horrible confuse-a-gram like the one for the February data, I’ll be posting the 1 week before-and-after amazon rank results for the March data after I’m done collecting it. Additionally, I’ll be posting updates on an interesting finding I’ve had with the data for a particular series that will likely help me nail down the  worth of the lower (100,000th or worse in movies and TV) ranking numbers.

How will I do that? Aria the Natural’s part 2 release was low-stocked and has not been purchased frequently. That means that, each day, the amazon page displays the total number of disks in stock at that time. This means I can use the daily decline (or lack thereof) in daily stock to determine how much its approximate ranking is worth in terms of daily sales. Emphasis on “lack thereof”:

Aria-InstockChart is date, rank, # in stock

This is a strong indication that places worse than 120,000th correspond to 1 or fewer purchases per day, which is an extremely useful bit of information. Whatever the eventual shape of any amazon-rank-to-sales fit ends up being, it should probably approach zero for rank values of that size. Also, it makes a handy cutoff point for measuring sales longevity; # of days above 120,000th place can be used to compare with series release-period sales peak as an important alternative measure of success. Selling 3 copies over 100 days is better than selling 10 copies in 1 day and 0-1 in every other.

Graphs of each of the eleven March 4th releases tracked over the past 2 weeks are shown after the break. I’ll save commentary for the end of the month, when I have at least the complete sample to work with, and at best a reasonable fit for the ballpark each series’ ranking is in in terms of total sales.

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Fun With Numbers: March 2014 Amazon Data (Initial Numbers)

Way back in December, I started a rough, bare-bones look at a bit of publicly available data; US Amazon TV/Movie bestseller list rankings for anime releases. That data collection is mostly done, pending K’s release this Tuesday, and it yielded some potentially interesting nuggets (expect that summary post to happen before this next weekend). Enough so that I plan to do the same at least for the month of March. This is a list of the releases I’ll be tracking over the next 30 days, with their release dates, prices, and initial rankings. All series were accessed via amazon’s upcoming anime releases page.

Two points before the list itself:

-I compiled my February list too early (several titles were only announced for release after I built my list), and missed the opportunity to track some releases that way. Since most titles tracked in the February sample were relatively steady and very low on the list until a week before release (save for Robotics;Notes’ ridiculously discounted edition), I’m going to start tracking monthly rankings approximately one week prior to the first set of releases from now on.

-The price I note is the series’ MSRP price. If the series becomes listed at more than 50% off that price at any time during the amazon solicitation, I will note that both now and during the final analysis. The February part 1 release of Robotics;Notes had such a discount.

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Fun With Numbers: Anime As Manga Advertisments in 2011 (Part 2: The Upper-Limit Baselines)

Update 2 (July 15, 2014): New, more accurate data is here.

Update (Jul 1, 2014): This post doesn’t measure releases in 2-week totals, which turns out to be a huge deal in many, many cases. I’m currently working on an updated version of both this and the other 2011-2012 manga boost posts. Just be aware of that before citing the data from here regarding any one show.

Way, way back, I published an article looking at how anime adaptations produced in early 2012 affected the sales of their source manga. It was interesting data to take a look at, and it was interesting to see which anime really boosted the manga sales. Long story short, there are cases where a manga really jumps from mid-tier to franchise level (Space Brothers, Kuroko’s Basketball, Inu x Boku SS) soon after the anime airs, and cases where the anime doesn’t have much visible effect.

Also way back, I started pulling sales records for manga that had an anime adaptation air in 2011, to get a better idea of how the two media are interrelated. This post contains the second half of that data, specifically the data for which I have maximum constraints for series before they aired, and at least one solid instance of making the Oricon charts afterwards. These aren’t quite the tier of hits in the first part of the data, but they’re more marginal, which makes the charts pretty interesting by themselves.

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